Refelcting on Conversations with Daito-Ryu Masters

Pranin, Stanley. Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu: Conversations with Daito-ryu Masters. Aiki News. 1996. In his never-ending research to better understand the many and the martial artist that was Morihei Ueshiba, the late Stanley Pranin followed the influence of Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu, specifically that of Ueshiba’s teacher, Sokaku Takeda. The aikido sources at the time of Pranin’s research seemed … Continue reading Refelcting on Conversations with Daito-Ryu Masters

Reflecting on By the Sword

Cohen, Richard. By the Sword: Gladiators, Musketeers, Samurai Warriors, Swashbucklers, and Olympians. London: Pocket, 2003. I recall starting this book when I was much younger, driven by my desire to take and ingest all things sword and samurai. I remember my younger self being disappointed that though in the subtitle mentioned samurai, the book wasn’t … Continue reading Reflecting on By the Sword

Reflecting on Shambhala’s Guide to Kendo

Kiyota, Minoura. The Shambhala Guide to Kendo: An Essential Introduction to the Principles of the Japanese Art of Swordsmanship. Boston, Mass.: Shambhala Publications, 1995. After finishing Alexander Bennet’s Kendo: Culture of the Sword, I searched for another book that covered some of the same topics and themes. Finally, I came across professor Minoru Kiyota’s Kendo … Continue reading Reflecting on Shambhala’s Guide to Kendo

Reflecting on Walther von Krenner’s Following the Martial Path

von Krenner, Walther G., and Ken Jeremiah. Following the Martial Path: Lessons and Stories from a Lifetime of Training in Budo and Zen. Spring House, PA: Tambuli Media, 2016. After reading Walther von Krenner’s Atemi, I wanted to acquire more of his work to understand how he reached his conclusions in Atemi. Soon, I found … Continue reading Reflecting on Walther von Krenner’s Following the Martial Path

Reflecting Alexander Bennett’s Culture of the Sword

Bennett, Alexander. Kendo: Culture of the Sword. 24th ed. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2015. Upon first opening Alexander Bennett’s book, I did not know what to fully expect. I know little about kendo training and its subtle movements and skills with the shinai, let alone a succinct history of the art. Bennett, however, … Continue reading Reflecting Alexander Bennett’s Culture of the Sword

Reflecting on John Steven’s Abundant Peace

Stevens, John. Abundant Peace: The Biography of Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido. Boston: Shambhala, 1987. The prolific aikido author John Stevens published his Abundant Peace in 1987, initially becoming one of the only sources of information outside of Aikido Journal on the art’s founder, Morihei Ueshiba, at the time. It provided many Western practitioners a … Continue reading Reflecting on John Steven’s Abundant Peace

Reflecting on Rod Nobuto Omoto’s Autobiography

Omoto, Rod. ‎Autobiography of Rod Omoto, 2015. https://books.apple.com/ar/book/autobiography-of-rod-omoto/id883795766. As I started this adventure into Nobuto “Rod” Omoto’s life, I thought I would be learning more about his time in the Pacific Northwest and his adventures there. However, I was surprised to take part in another adventure, years before he stepped foot into the region. From … Continue reading Reflecting on Rod Nobuto Omoto’s Autobiography

Reflecting on Joseph Svinth’s Getting a Grip

Svitnh, Joseph. Getting A Grip: Judo in the Nikkei Communities of the Pacific Northwest, 1900-1950. Guelph: EJMAS, 2003. Martial arts historian Joseph Svinth tackles the immense task of chronicling the foundation and growth of judo in the Pacific Northwest for the first fifty years of the twentieth century. Splitting his book into two parts – … Continue reading Reflecting on Joseph Svinth’s Getting a Grip

Reflecting on Walther von Krenner’s Atemi

von Krenner, Walther G., and Ken Jeremiah. Atemi: The Thunder and Lightning of Aikido. Spring House, PA: Tambuli Media, 2016. Beginning his aikido training in the early 1960s in Germany, Walther von Krenner soon moved to Japan to train under the founder himself, Morihei Ueshiba, his son, Kisshomaru, and then-chief instructor Koichi Tohei. In his … Continue reading Reflecting on Walther von Krenner’s Atemi